Selous Game Reserve

Selous Game Reserve

Located in south-east Tanzania in a remote and little-visited part of the country, the Selous Game Reserve is Africa's largest protected wildlife reserve and covers more than 5% of Tanzania's total area. It's rivers, hills, and plains are home to roaming elephant populations, the area's famous wild dogs, and some of the last black rhino left in the region. Due to its remote location, and because it is most easily accessible only by small aircraft, the Selous Game Reserve has remained one of the untouched gems of Tanzania's national parks and game reserves, and offers visitors a chance to see a wild and expansive Africa far from paved roads and curio shops.

One of the more historic protected areas in Tanzania, the Selous Game Reserve was named after Frederick Courteney Selous, a British explorer and hunter in East Africa who wrote a book about the region and his travels, and was tragically killed in land now named after him during the First World War. In 1905, when few people in East Africa thought of land conservation and the preservation of wildlife for posterity, portions of the area were earmarked for a hunting reserve. In 1922, the land area was increased and named after Frederick Selous. From then until 1975, when the current boundaries were delineated, the Selous Game Reserve increased steadily in allocated land. These days, tourists flock to the north of the reserve, while large portions of the south are still reserved for hunting.