Welcome To Tanzania

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CULTURAL SAFARIS

Close to the Kenyan boarder, Longido is an important Maasai area. With a famous Maasai cattle market and imposing Mt. Longido. From climbing Mount Longido, with a chance to see elephant and buffalo, to visiting a Maasai Boma to see and experience how this famous and unique people live. Camel rides into the bush or walking safaris to see giraffe, gerenuk, elephant, gazelle and much more.

camping

CAMPING SAFARIS

Camping in the bush of Tanzania is the quintessential African Safari experience. Just a piece of cloth between you and the African night. A quire of nocturnal birds, insects and distant roaring lions lullabies you to sleep. Sitting around an open camp fire with the southern skies bright over head is the real way of appreciating Africa’s magic. There are campsites everywhere and camping facilitates in all our safari itineraries, to any park or wilderness area in Tanzania.

Tarangire National Park

This park is known for its elephants.  You will see these enormous creatures travel in families and you surely will not miss the extraordinary care they take of their young.  The elephants tend to travel in packs and in the same paths as they have taken year after year.  When they see your vehicle coming closer they will gather around their young to protect them and lead them on their way.

Animal Migration
While Serengeti’s animal migration has attained mundane fame, for many tourists, little is known of Tarangire annual migration. The difference with Serengeti however is that, in Serengeti animals migrate away from the park during the dry season (June to October), the opposite happens in Tarangire; animals migrate from Maasai Steppe to the park during the dry season. They migrate to the park in search for water, which is provided by Tarangire River, and predators migrate along in search for preys. During this period the park has the largest concentration of animals than in any park in the northern Tanzania.

Wildlife
June to October is the best time to see large number of wildebeest, elephants, zebras, and hartebeest. Not all animals are migratory though, other animals such as giraffes, Impala, Eland, lesser kudu, waterbuck, gazelle and sometimes rhinos or leopards can be seen throughout the year. More people are attracted by the giant pythons and large herds of elephants. the park is also famous for migrant birds.

 

Serengeti National Park

The park covers 14,763 sq km of endless rolling plains, which reach up to the Kenyan border and extends almost to Lake Victoria. The park is flourishing with magnificent wildlife. An estimated 3 million large animals roam the plains. People of the Maasai Tribe called it Siringitu – ‘the place where the land moves on forever.’ The Serengeti is known as one of the best wildlife sanctuary in the world.

Wildlife

The Serengeti boasts large herds of antelope including Patterson’s eland, Klipspringer, Dikdik, Zebra, gazelles, lion, impala, leopard, cheetah, hyena and other larger mammals like the rhino, giraffe, elephant and hippopotamus. Nearly 500 species of birds have been recorded in the park. The Serengeti is an opportunity for one of the best game-viewing in Africa.

Migration in the Serengeti

The wildebeest migration, like a discernible thread, embraces and connects the Serengeti’s ecosystem much as it has done for at least two millions years.
Every year, with some seasonally dictated variations in timing and scale, one million wildebeest leave the southern Serengeti’s short grass plains in search of the grass and water they need to survive.

ngorongoro_rhino

NGORONGORO CRATER

Nearly three million years ago Ngorongoro towered alongside Mount Kilimanjaro as one of the highest peaks in Africa. Forged during the tumultuous birth of the Rift Valley, its volcanic top erupted at the time that ancient man first walked the plains.The Ngorongoro Conservation Area (NCA) covers some 8,300 square kilometres. It boasts the finest blend of landscapes, wildlife, people and archaeological sites in Africa.

Lake Manyara National Park

Lake Manyara National Park, which encompasses an area of 330 sq.km, of which 200 sq.km is lake, was proclaimed a game reserve in 1957 and registered three years later as a National Park. The park is situated between the 600 m high escarpment of the Great Rift Valley and Lake Manyara and is 130 km from Arusha.

Wildlife

Nestling at the base of the Great Rift Valley escarpment, the park is recognized for its incredible beauty. Wildlife at Lake Manyara is not restricted to birdlife only. Many game animals such as Buffalo, Elephant, Giraffe, Impala, hippo and a great variety of smaller animals also inhabit the park.

Birdlife

More than 400 species of bird including flamingo, pelican, red billed quelea, storks, sacred ibis, cormorants and Egyptian geese can be sighted in this area. Other species of birds include the African spoonbill, lesser flamingo, white pelican and white faced duck.

Arusha National Park

Arusha National Park has incredible volcanic scenery, wonderful views of Mt Kilimanjaro (on clear days), a beautiful rainforest and plenty of wildlife. The main features are Ngurdoto Crater and the Momella Lakes. The Momella Lakes attract a wide variety of birds, particularly flamingos. Guests sometimes enjoy this park just as much as the Serengeti. Its close proximity to Arusha usually means that it gets put first on a Northern Parks itinerary.
Location: 45 minutes driving from Arusha town, Activities: Game Drives, Canoeing, Forest walk, Mt. Meru Climb.

Wildlife

The Park contains a diverse resident population of herbivores, primates and predators including black and white colobus monkeys, baboons, elephants, giraffes, buffalos, hippos, leopards, hyenas, waterbucks, wart hogs and a wide range of antelope species. No lions in the park although you can see leopards if you are lucky.

Walking and Climbing

If you wish to walk on the Mount Meru (4566 m) sector of the park through a variety of landscapes, plains, forest moorlands, and a lava desert, it is compulsory to be accompanied by an armed game warden because the wild animals. From the summit of Mount Meru you will have an impressive view of the crater and of the eruption cone 3000 metres below .

Kitulo Plateau National Park

Locals refer to the Kitulo Plateau as Bustani ya Mungu – The Garden of God – while botanists have dubbed it the Serengeti of Flowers, host to ‘one of the great floral spectacles of the world’. And Kitulo is indeed a rare botanical marvel, home to a full 350 species of vascular plants, including 45 varieties of terrestrial orchid, which erupt into a riotous wildflower display of breathtaking scale.

One of the most important watersheds for the Great Ruaha River, Kitulo is well known for its floral significance – not only a multitude of orchids, but also the stunning yellow-orange red-hot poker and a variety of aloes, proteas, geraniums, giant lobelias, lilies and aster daisies, of which more than 30 species are endemic to southern Tanzania. Big game is sparsely represented, though a few hardy mountain reedbuck and eland still roam the open grassland.

Udzungwa Mountain National Park

Udzungwa is the largest and most biodiversity of a chain of a dozen large forest-swathed mountains that rise majestically in Eastern Tanzania.

Known collectively as the Eastern Arc Mountains, it has also been dubbed the African Galapagos for its treasure-trove of endemic plants and animals, most familiarly the delicate African violet.  It is a magnet for hikers, with its excellent network of forest trails.

Ornithologists are attracted by the avian wealth of more than 400 species. Of six primate species recorded, the Iringa red colobus and Sanje Crested Mangabey (discovered in 1979) both occur nowhere else in the world.

Location: South of Mikumi, between Ruaha National Park and Selous Game Reserves
Activities: Nature Hiking

Selous Game Reserve

Located in south-east Tanzania in a remote and little-visited part of the country, the Selous Game Reserve is Africa’s largest protected wildlife reserve and covers more than 5% of Tanzania’s total area. It’s rivers, hills, and plains are home to roaming elephant populations, the area’s famous wild dogs, and some of the last black rhino left in the region. Due to its remote location, and because it is most easily accessible only by small aircraft, the Selous Game Reserve has remained one of the untouched gems of Tanzania’s national parks and game reserves, and offers visitors a chance to see a wild and expansive Africa far from paved roads and curio shops.

One of the more historic protected areas in Tanzania, the Selous Game Reserve was named after Frederick Courteney Selous, a British explorer and hunter in East Africa who wrote a book about the region and his travels, and was tragically killed in land now named after him during the First World War. In 1905, when few people in East Africa thought of land conservation and the preservation of wildlife for posterity, portions of the area were earmarked for a hunting reserve. In 1922, the land area was increased and named after Frederick Selous. From then until 1975, when the current boundaries were delineated, the Selous Game Reserve increased steadily in allocated land. These days, tourists flock to the north of the reserve, while large portions of the south are still reserved for hunting.

The Rufigi River Delta is a striking feature of the game reserve. It connects the Great Ruaha River with the Rufigi River and not far from the park boundaries empties out into the Indian Ocean along the Tanzanian Coast. The Rufigi River is the largest water catchment locations in the region, and as such, is home to a plethora of varied water and bird life. Along its shores, oppulent hippos sleep languidly in the mud and sun themselves, mouths wide open, as the river passes by. Crocodiles are also common along the Rufigi’s riverbanks, their armour plated skins the only rough edges in the rivers incessant flow. Stiggler’s Gorge, where the Great Ruaha River meets the Rufiji River, is a breathtaking example of the diversity and spectacular scenery along the game reserve’s waterways.

Ruaha National Park

Tanzania’s second-largest national park after the Serengeti, Ruaha National Park is a remote bastion of spectacular wilderness, undisturbed wildlife, and breathtaking scenery. With herds of more than 10,000 elephants, vast concentrations of buffalo, gazelle, and over 400 bird species, Ruaha’s limitless wilderness, together with the surrounding game reserves of Rungwa and Kisigo — stretches over 40,000 square kilometres. Elephants are found in some of the highest concentration in the country, travelling in matriarch-lead herds through ancient grazing lands and seasonal supplies of water.

The Great Ruaha River is the main feature of the park, and meanders through its borders. On its banks, the game viewing is spectacular, whether done by land or by water. Hippos yawn under the midday sun and crocodiles lie lazily along the banks. Fish eagles dive and swoop along the riverbanks, and at night the sound of frogs croaking happily in the reeds extends across the hills and plains. Boating safaris are starting to gain in popularity, and provide a popular alternative to viewing the area by car.

Most of the national park is located on the top of a 900 metre plateau whose ripples of hills, valleys, and plains makes the game viewing topography beautifully unique. Small mountains run along the southwest borders of the park and their tree-covered slopes are visible in the distance. During the rainy seasons, dry river beds swell with the biannual deluge and within days, a thin coat of green covers all the land in sight.

Because of its rather remote location, Ruaha National Park is largely unexplored. Because of this, a safari to the national park often has the feel of a private adventure and an unique experience. For the intrepid wilderness lover and the avid safari explorer, a trip to Ruaha is uniquely rewarding and a perfect piece of Africa.

Mikumi National Park

Due to the completion of the paved road connecting the park gate with Dar es Salaam, Mikumi National Park is slated to become a hotspot for tourism in Tanzania. Located between the Uluguru Mountains and the Lumango range, Mikumi is the fourth largest park in Tanzania and only a few hours drive from Tanzania’s largest city, the park has a wide variety of wildlife that are easy to spot and well acclimatised to game viewing. Its proximity to Dar es Salaam and the amount of wildlife that live within its borders makes Mikumi National Park a popular option for weekend visitors from the city, or for business visitors who don’t have long to spend on an extended safari itinerary.

 

Most visitors come to Mikumi National Park looking to spot the ‘Big Five’ (cheetah, lion, elephant, buffalo, and rhino), and they aren’t disappointed. Hippo pools provide close access to the mud-loving beasts, and bird-watching along the waterways is particularly rewarding. Mikumi National Park borders the Selous Game Reserve and Udzungwa National Park, and the three locations make a varied and pleasant safari circuit.

Rubondo National Park

Rubondo Island is tucked in the southwest corner of Lake Victoria, the world’s second-largest lake, an inland sea sprawling between Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya.

Rubondo is more than a water wonderland. Deserted sandy beaches nestle against a cloak of virgin forest, where dappled bushbuck and the shaggy-coated aquatic Sitatunga move fleet yet silent through a maze of tamarinds, wild palms, and sycamore figs strung with a least 200 bird species.

A number of indigenous mammal species – hippo, vervet monkey, genet and mongoose – share their protected habitat with introduced species such as chimpanzee, black-and-white colobus, elephant and giraffe, all of which benefit from Rubondo’s inaccessibility.

Location: Island in Lake Victoria, reachable by flight form Arusha or Serengeti
Activities: Nature Walk, Fishing and Boat Excursion

Katavi National Park

Isolated, untrammeled and seldom visited, Katavi is a true wilderness, providing the few intrepid souls who make it there with a thrilling taste of Africa as it must have been a century ago.

Tanzania’s third largest national park, it lies in the remote southwest of the country, within a truncated arm of the Rift Valley that terminates in the shallow, brooding expanse of Lake Rukwa.

The bulk of Katavi supports a hypnotically featureless cover of tangled woodland, home to substantial but elusive populations of the localized eland, sable and roan antelopes. But the main focus for game viewing within the park is the Katuma River and associated floodplains such as the seasonal Lakes Katavi and Chada.

It is during the dry season, when the floodwaters retreat, that Katavi truly comes into its own. The Katuma, reduced to a shallow, forms the only source of drinking water for miles around, and the flanking floodplains support game concentrations. With an abundance of giraffe, zebra, impala and reedbuck provide easy pickings for the numerous lion prides and spotted hyena clans whose territories converge on the floodplains.

Mahale Mountain National Park

Mahale National Park is home to some of the last remaining wild chimpanzees: Tracking the chimps is a fascinating experience. T likely that you will observe them grooming each other in small groups, squabbling noisily, or bounding from tree to tree swinging on vines.

Watching a mother chimp with her offspring is truly remarkable. Difficult to reach and relatively expensive, Mahale has few visitors each year. And although chimpanzees are admittedly the main attraction, the park supports a diverse forest fauna, including troops of red colobus, red-tailed and blue monkeys, and a colorful array of forest birds.

Location: Western Tanzania, reachable by flight from Arusha or Dar Es Salaam
Activities: Chimpanzee Trekking, Hiking, Swimming and Fishing

Gombe Stream National Park

It is Tanzania’s smallest parks, covering an area of 52 sq.km, Gombe is a narrow strip of chimpanzee habitat on the shore of Lake Tanganyika. Its chimpanzees – habituated to human visitors – were made famous by the pioneering work of Jane Goodall’s studies.

Due to the park being heavily forested, large game animal are not found in this area, but the park is home to a number of different species of monkey including the red colobus, red-tail and blue monkey, grey duiker, bushbuck and bushpig as well numerous species of bird including trumpter hornbills, Roos’s turaco, crowed eagle, narrow tailed starling to mention a few.

The park can only be accessed by boat
Location: North-western Tanzania, 16Km North of Kigoma town. Usually requires flight with Precision Air from Dar Es Salaam (daily) or charter flight from Arusha
Activities: Chimpanzee trekking, swimming/snorkeling

Kilimanjaro

KILIMANJARO TREKKING

Mount Kilimanjaro is one of the majestic mountains in the World having six different ways to the top. A little bit of calculation have been employed that Marangu route is best for both ascending and descending for itself and other routes, Machame, Shira, Umbwe, Rongai and Lemosho are for climbing only due to the nature of landscape its risky to some levels when reached to descend using them.

Zanzibar

ZANZIBAR BEACH HOLIDAY

It is a unique place. The intriguing history tells us about brave sea traders, explorers, Sultans and the fragrance of exotic spices. The exceptional architecture and construction of the coral stone buildings and narrow streets carries the imprints of the influences of various cultures and traditions brought in by the Stone Town inhabitants. Each building; its windows, its carved doors, its walls tells its own historical past.

Migration

SERENGETI MIGRATION

The great Serengeti wildebeest migration is the movement of vast numbers of the Serengeti’s wildebeest, accompanied by big numbers of zebra; they migrate throughout the year, constantly seeking fresh grass and water.Migration/crossing begin From May to August passing different part of the Serengeti including grummet river before arrive at Mara river.

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